Here Are The Questions You Asked About Homelessness In LA. Vote On The One You Want To Discuss

A woman pushes her walker past tents housing the homeless in Los Angeles, California on February 9, 2016. (Photo: Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

The crisis is all around us. Some 54,000 people in L.A. County are homeless, making it the second-largest homeless population in the country, after New York City. And even though the latest count showed a dip in the overall number of homeless people from the year before, the population of people experiencing homelessness for the first time went up.

We're hosting a live, in-person conversation around this problem that faces us every day in L.A. — and it'll be based on your questions.

We asked you: How should L.A. address its homelessness problem? What discussion do you think we should be having around homelessness?

You submitted a lot of questions on this. We collected and narrowed them down to three. And now we want you to tell us what you think the focus of the conversation should be.

Here are the submissions to choose from. You have until the end of day Sunday, August 12, to vote. You can find longer descriptions of each question below.

How many families are homeless, and how are we attacking this issue?
How do homeless children go to school, and how do homeless parents hold a steady job, if at all? What are the challenges that couples, parents, children, and the elderly face when trying to get help to stay off the streets?

What is being done in the way of homelessness prevention for people at risk?
How are we preventing at-risk Angelenos from falling into homelessness? When it comes to programs addressing mental health, social services and housing support in L.A., what more do we need to do?

What policy steps is the city taking to address housing unaffordability and homelessness?
Voters recently greenlit nearly $5 billion in city and county spending to tackle homelessness. So what's being done?

And for that matter, what more can we do? Those who say we should increase housing density and rent control say these changes will help the homelessness crisis. What laws are being passed and put up on voter ballots that can affect housing affordability in L.A.?

We'll be holding our conversation on this with KPCC In Person and host Libby Denkmann on Sept. 6 at the Japanese American National Museum in downtown Los Angeles. RSVP here.


News happens every day. Here at LAist, our goal is to cover the stories that matter to you and the community you live in. Now that we're part of KPCC, those stories (including this one you're on right now!) are made possible by generous people like you. Independent, local journalism isn't cheap, but with your support we can keep delivering it. Donate now.