Naked Carwash Scene Brings A Stop To Campus Filming At LAUSD

Don't expect another 'Hot For Teacher' music video to be filmed on campus any time soon.

L.A.'s Unified School District has suspended commercial filming on all school campuses following allegations that some have damaged property and disturbed classes, reports the L.A. Times. One shoot may have even included a nude car wash scene for a porn movie.

L.A.'s schools have long been the setting for countless films, television shows, commercials and music videos. They also bring in lots of money to the district from production companies, including roughly $10 million over the past five years, according to the Times. But an investigation by NBC4 explored allegations that some film shoots in recent years disrupted and delayed students and teachers, broke school property and, at least in one case, got a bit too educational.

According to NBC4, film permits and district records show that 2012 porn film Revenge of the Petites—which likely has little to do with the plight of nerds—paid cash to film on the campus of Hamilton High. The filming allegedly included a nude car wash scene shot in the school's front parking lot. In response, LAUSD told NBC4 that the filmmakers had misled them and that they wouldn't have knowingly allowed them to shoot a film like that. District spokeswoman Shannon Haber told NBC4 in an email, "We immediately notified the production company that it was banned from ever using district facilities again. We also demanded that the company remove any and all images depicting the school or its students from the film."

The report found that some students complained of delays in getting to class on time, while some parents complained that the content of some shoots was not been appropriate for the filming location.

Following the NBC4 report, district Superintendent Ramon C. Cortines authorized the district's inspector general to look into the issue of filming on campus while the suspension is in place.

"It is important that we ensure teaching and learning are not disrupted, and that all filming activity is appropriate for our schools," Cortines said in a statement to the Times. "As an organization responsible for educating students, it is essential that we hold ourselves and our schools to a high standard."